… and what have we then to be proud of?

Once again I find myself in Matthew Henry’s commentary on Genesis. Here our brother points our the humble origin of man, dust. He uses this little fact to remind us that we have nothing to be proud of. How can one be proud of that which is going to crumble? he writes:

0_0_0_0_188_234_csupload_30932249

The matter was despicable. He was made of the dust of the ground, a very unlikely thing to make a man of but the same infinite power that made the world of nothing made man, its master-piece, of next to nothing. He was made of the dust, the small dust, such as is upon the surface of the earth. Probably, not dry dust, but dust moistened with the mist that went up, Genesis 2:6. He was not made of gold-dust, powder of pearl, or diamond dust, but common dust, dust of the ground. Hence he is said to be of the earth, choikosdusty, 1┬áCorinthians 15:47. And we also are of the earth, for we are his offspring, and of the same mould. So near an affinity is there between the earth and our earthly parents that our mother’s womb, out of which we were born, is called the earth (Psalm 139:15), and the earth, in which we must be buried, is called our mother’s womb, Job 1:21. Our foundation is in the earth, Job 4:19. Our fabric is earthly, and the fashioning of it like that of an earthen vessel, Job 10:9. Our food is out of the earth, Job 28:5. Our familiarity is with the earth, Job 17:14. Our fathers are in the earth, and our own final tendency is to it and what have we then to be proud of?

 

Advertisements